Acne and Skin Health

Makeup Tips for Women With Eczema and Psoriasis

Finding makeup that doesn’t irritate eczema or psoriasis can be daunting, and expensive. But it’s an exercise worth undertaking since conventional makeup contains many chemicals and other irritants that can make any skin condition worse.

How does makeup irritate eczema and other skin conditions?

Makeup, creams, cleansers and other products you put on your face are generally made for people with “normal” skin. Normal skin can take a bit of fragrance, preservatives and other ingredients without much irritation. If you suffer from eczema or psoriasis, however, there are certain things you need to avoid, including:

  • Fragrances, which may be listed as “Parfum”
  • Preservatives, which will typically end with “paraben” in the name
  • Skin-drying ingredients such as glycolic acid, salicylic acid, and retinol

Fragrances and preservatives will irritate skin, while the skin-drying ingredients will worsen eczema and psoriasis. You will even find these ingredients in some products marketed as being appropriate for sensitive skin.

Ingredients to look for

Look for any product that moisturises the skin, such as hyaluronic acid, shea butter, lanolin and glycerin. You will also find hyaluronic acid in LQ Advanced Skin Care liquid supplement, which helps to hydrate your skin from the inside – not just the outer layers. B3, or Niacinamide, will help to lessen redness and can usually be found in primers and other products which are marketed for this purpose.

Look for green shades and primers

If you have patches of red on your neck and face, try green eyeshadow shades, foundation primers and concealer. Green lessens the appearance of redness on your face. Take a look at how this rosacea sufferer went from seriously patchy to flawless with green concealer and a few other makeup tricks. Stunning! Just be sure to keep an eye on the ingredients.

While applying makeup, use a dabbing or patting motion and don’t get too aggressive with rubbing. Clean your makeup brushes well and often. Stay away from shimmery tones as this can highlight redness; jeweled tones can also harbour ingredients which are additional irritants to skin, such as mica.

Covering up raised scales and flakes – don’t

If you have raised scales from eczema or psoriasis, putting makeup over top may feel like a quick fix, but it will actually make things worse both for your skin condition and appearance. You’ll be highlighting the flakes rather than covering them up. The best thing is to tackle these with medications, good diet, and self-care before you get to the makeup stage. Avoid these areas with makeup. If, for example, you have a bit of eczema flaking on your eyelid, just stick to mascara and eyeliner if the flaking part isn’t on your lower eyelid.

Cleanse and moisturise after wearing makeup

If you are putting on makeup for a night out, it can be tempting to fall asleep without removing it. However, you absolutely should remove it, as even the most virtuous ingredients won’t do your eczema or psoriasis any good if you leave them on too long. Try setting a reminder in your smartphone for the time you think you’ll be going to bed to make sure you do it.

In your cleansing routine, stay away from exfoliants and irritating foam cleansers. All of the ingredients we mentioned above for makeup are things you should be looking out for when you purchase a cleanser. If you’re doing a double-take at “no exfoliants”, here’s why you should avoid them – they scrape away the healthy skin cells with the dead ones, and actually encourage your patches to reform once they’ve been scraped off – much like scratching does. Remove dead skin the old-fashioned way with clean hands and a facecloth, being careful not to rub or scrape too hard.

Changing up your diet to include more green, leafy vegetables and water can help with any skin condition. LQ Advanced Skin Care liquid supplement is designed to assist normal skin health and could be worth throwing in the mix for an added boost.